Canadian Council on Invasive Species | CCIS

Read Highlights of the National Invasive Species Forum

Ottawa | Feb 28 - Mar 2, 2017

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Provincial Spotters Networks

Spotters Networks improve the distributional and ecological data in each of the following participating provinces/territories, as well as contribute nationally to early detection and rapid response (EDRR) efforts. Members of a Canadian Spotter’s Network share a common interest in reducing the economic, social and environmental impacts of invasive species. A common platform for Canadian Spotter’s Network is under development.


Prince Edward Island  
The Spotters Network of the PEI Invasive Species Council is targeting plants species. It provides training materials such as a list of species and key cards. Surveys are conducted if the invasive reported is known to be a particularly bad invader or if it poses a public health risk. 


Manitoba  
The Manitoba Invasive Species Council runs a Weed Spotter’s Program and provides an online report form. The website makes available maps, videos, brochures and school programs. People form Manitoba are also invited to use EDDMap Prairies (a web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species distribution. It is fast, easy to use and doesn't require Geographic Information Systems experience).


Saskatchewan   
The Saskatchewan Invasive Species Council provides a database and mapping system aimed at land managers and owners including rural municipalities, community pastures, parks, urban areas, government agencies, or conservation organizations. The system in place is iMapInvasives which originates from the U.S., so, data from participating states can also been viewed. Concerned members of the general public are encouraged to use it as well. A number of tools such as forms and templates to help land managers record track and manage their invasive species occurrences, fact sheets, posters are available. People are invited to use EDDMap Prairies (a web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species distribution. It is fast, easy to use and doesn't require Geographic Information Systems experience).


Alberta  
The Alberta Invasive Species Council (AISC) Spotter’s Network implements an invasive species tracking and reporting program, currently tracking 62 aquatic and terrestrial species: 49 terrestrial plants, 4 aquatic plants and 3 aquatic animals. Extensive tools and training materials are available on the council’s website. AISC invites the use of its EDDMapS system


British Columbia  
The Invasive Species Council of British Columbia (ISCBC) Spotters Network uses online reporting tools, a hotline and a phone app called “Report a Weed”. The Invasive Alien Plant Program (IAPP) - Map Display is a web-based mapping and reporting tool provided by the BC Ministry of Forests and Range to assist land management agencies, non-government organizations, and the public in developing and delivering effective invasive plant management programs throughout British Columbia. It displays invasive plant inventory and treatment information that is taken from the IAPP database. Data are entered by a wide variety of agencies and non-profit organizations around the province. IAPP Map Display is updated every 24 hours to give users access to the most current data available. The information that is reported is held in the IAPP (Invasive Alien Plant Program) database. 

The British Columbia Spotter’s Network has developed a wide variety of communication materials. Among those, there are five different trainings sessions: Invasive Plants 101, Agriculture and Range Invasive Plants, Aquatic Invasive Plants, Horticultural Invasive Plants, and Aboriginal People and Invasive Plants. Workshop materials to host trainings sessions (participant packages, presentations) are also available.  


Yukon  
In the Yukon, the Spotter's Network program targeting plants and animals (mussels) is initiated by the Yukon Invasive Species Council. The Spotter's Network focuses on community-based environmental stewardship simultaneously increasing awareness and understanding in early detection and control of invasive species. The map data on non-native plants species in the Yukon is currently hosted and by the Alaska Exotic Plants Information Clearinghouse (AKEPIC). Yukon Invasive Species Council resources and materials include training sessions, brochures, posters and info sheets.