Canadian Council on Invasive Species | CCIS

Read Highlights of the National Invasive Species Forum

Ottawa | Feb 28 - Mar 2, 2017

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Canadian Council

on Invasive Species

Programs based on Key Pathways

National invasive species management programs and initiatives are based on key pathways for the introduction and spread invasive species across Canada. Many of the invasive species prevention programs that have been implemented in the past several years have been based on using the principles of community based social marketing (CBSM) and targeted at changing specific behaviours of individuals. These include:

  • Horticulture - plant based activities including gardening, and horticulture 
  • Recreation - walking, hunting, fishing, camping, bicycling, OHV use, and pets
  • Boaters and Water Activities
  • Pet and Aquarium Trade - invasive species movement and release (including pets)
  • Forestry and Firewood
  • Work and Equipment Movement

Pathway: Horticulture - plant based activities including gardening, horticulture 

Program Strategies and Objectives: Horticulture, including plants grown for gardening, has been one of the largest intentional pathways for alien invasive plant introduction in Canada. Importing of plants from around the world, as well as from region to region within Canada has resulted in a great number of invasive plant issues in Canada. Successful programs targeted to nurseries, plant distribution centers and horticultural organizations and gardeners have raised the awareness of invasive plant impacts and issues.

Programs: Grow Me Instead, Grow Me Instead Nursery Recognition Program, PlantWise, Garden Smart


Pathway: Recreation - walking, hunting, fishing, camping, bicycling, OHV (Off Highway Vehicle) use, horses and pets 

Program Strategies and Objectives: Recreation (walking, hunting, fishing, camping, bicycling, OHV use, horses and pets) is becoming a very significant pathway for potentially spreading invasive species throughout large tracts of environmentally sensitive areas. Recreationists generally have low awareness of their individual role in spreading invasive species, and they and do not understand how invasive species can negatively impact recreational areas. Education and outreach programs such as PlayCleanGo are designed to educate recreationists on their role in preventing the spread of invasive species.
Programs: PlayCleanGo, Look Before You Leave, Buy it Where you Burn It 


Pathway: Boaters and Water Activities 

Program Strategies and Objectives: Water based activities have become important pathways for unintentional and intentional spread of invasive species, including plant, fish, invertebrate, and molluscs and crustaceans. International cargo ships have had a significant role in bring invasive species in bilge water into the Canadian ecosystem, including Zebra and Quagga mussels, and lamprey eels.  Additionally, recreational boating has been responsible to spreading zebra and quagga mussels and Eurasian milfoil throughout North America water ways.   Education and regulation is now an important mechanism for preventing the spread of invasive species in aquatic systems.  
Programs: Clean Drain Dry, Aquatic Hitchhikers, Look Before You Leave 


Pathway: Pet and Aquarium Trade- Invasive species movement and release (including pets) 

Program Strategies and Objectives: The intentional release of pets (animals, fish, aquatic plants and species) into natural areas or waterways is potentially a very serious issue Canada.  Often these species are from other regions of Canada, North America, or even the world, and when released, may not have any natural predators or environmental factors to limit the species from spreading exponentially.  While people are thinking they are doing the ecosystem or environment a favor by adding new animals to the outdoors, they are actually doing the opposite. These ‘new species’ often displace the native species or take over the important habitat of native species. Also, movement of firewood can result in the spread of species such as mountain pine beetle,  elm bark beetle or forest diseases, which can cause great harm to trees in non-infested areas. Education and outreach programs such as ’Don’t let it loose’ and ‘Buy it where you burn it ‘are designed to educate people about the dangers of invasive species movement and release as a pathway of introduction into vulnerable areas.
Programs: Don’t let it loose, Buy it Where you Burn It


Pathway: Forestry and Firewood

Program Strategies and Objectives: The spread of invasive species by workplace equipment and wood can be very significant. The intentional movement of firewood into natural areas or other ecosystems is potentially a very serious issue in Canada. Often these species are from other regions of Canada, North America, or even the world, and when released, may not have any natural predators or environmental factors to limit the species from spreading exponentially.  Also, movement of firewood can result in the spread of species such as mountain pine beetle, or elm bark beetle, which can cause great harm to trees in no-infested areas. Education and outreach programs such as and ‘Buy it where you burn it ‘or “Don’t move firewood” are designed to educate people about the dangers of invasive species movement and release as a pathway of introduction into vulnerable areas. Camping equipment from RV to trailers, and trucks can transport all different types of invasive species along work corridors, roads, and site to site. Programs targeted at this pathway often include Best Practices for Industry, protocols for cleaning equipment, and education and awareness about invasive species spread for employees.
Programs: Buy it where you burn it, Work Clean Go, Clean Equipment Protocol


Pathway: Work and Equipment

Program Strategies and Objectives: The spread of invasive species by workplace equipment can be very significant.  Equipment from farm tractors to earth moving excavators, and even trucks can transport all different types of invasive species along work corridors, roads, and site to site. Programs targeted at this pathway often include Best Practices for Industry, protocols for cleaning equipment, and education and awareness about invasive species spread for employees.
Programs: Work Clean Go, Clean Equipment Protocol